Deletion without rebalancing in balanced binary trees

Siddhartha Sen, Robert E. Tarjan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

We address the vexing issue of deletions in balanced trees. Rebalancing after a deletion is generally more complicated than rebalancing after an insertion. Textbooks neglect deletion rebalancing, and many database systems do not do it. We describe a relaxation of AVL trees in which rebalancing is done after insertions but not after deletions, yet access time remains logarithmic in the number of insertions. For many applications of balanced trees, our structure offers performance competitive with that of classical balanced trees. With the addition of periodic rebuilding, the performance of our structure is theoretically superior to that of many if not all classic balanced tree structures. Our structure needs O(log log m) bits of balance information per node, where m is the number of insertions, or O(log log n) with periodic rebuilding, where n is the number of nodes. An insertion takes up to two rotations and O(1) amortized time. Using an analysis that relies on an exponential potential function, we show that rebalancing steps occur with a frequency that is exponentially small in the height of the affected node.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 21st Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages1490-1499
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9780898717013
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Event21st Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Jan 17 2010Jan 19 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms

Other

Other21st Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period1/17/101/19/10

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Mathematics(all)

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