Context-processing deficits in schizophrenia: Converging evidence from three theoretically motivated cognitive tasks

Jonathan D. Cohen, Deanna M. Barch, Cameron Carter, David Servan-Schreiber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

To test the hypothesis that the ability to actively represent and maintain context information is a central function of working memory and that a disturbance in this function contributes to cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, the authors modified 3 tasks - the AX version of the Continuous Performance Test, Stroop, and a lexical disambiguation task - and administered them to patients with schizophrenia as well as to depressed and healthy controls. The results suggest an accentuation of deficits in patients with schizophrenia in context-sensitive conditions and cross-task correlations of performance in these conditions. However, the results do not definitively eliminate the possibility of a generalized deficit. The significance of these findings is discussed with regard to the specificity of deficits in schizophrenia and the hypothesis concerning the neural and cognitive mechanisms that underlie these deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-133
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume108
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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