Concept possession, experimental semantics, and hybrid theories of reference

James Genone, Tania Lombrozo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Contemporary debates about the nature of semantic reference have tended to focus on two competing approaches: theories which emphasize the importance of descriptive information associated with a referring term, and those which emphasize causal facts about the conditions under which the use of the term originated and was passed on. Recent empirical work by Machery and colleagues suggests that both causal and descriptive information can play a role in judgments about the reference of proper names, with findings of cross-cultural variation in judgments that imply differences between individuals with respect to whether they favor causal or descriptive information in making reference judgments. We extend this theoretical and empirical line of inquiry to views of the reference of natural and nominal kind concepts, which face similar challenges to those concerning the reference of proper names. In two experiments, we find evidence that both descriptive and causal factors contribute to judgments of concept reference, with no reliable differences between natural and nominal kinds. Moreover, we find evidence that the same individuals' judgments can rely on both descriptive and causal information, such that variation between individuals cannot be explained by appeal to a mixed population of "pure descriptive theorists" and "pure causal theorists." These findings suggest that the contrast between descriptive and causal theories of reference may be inappropriate; intuitions may instead support a hybrid theory of reference that includes both causal and descriptive factors. We propose that future research should focus on the relationship between these factors, and describe several possible frameworks for pursuing these issues. Our findings have implications for theories of semantic reference, as well as for theories of conceptual structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-742
Number of pages26
JournalPhilosophical Psychology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Philosophy

Keywords

  • Concepts
  • Experimental Philosophy
  • Semantics
  • Theories of Reference

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