Competition in the promised land: Black migration and racial wage convergence in the North, 1940-1970

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Four million blacks left the South from 1940 to 1970, doubling the northern black workforce. I exploit variation in migrant flows within skill groups over time to estimate the elasticity of substitution by race. I then use this estimate to calculate counterfactual rates of wage growth. I find that black wages in the North would have been around 7 percent higher in 1970 if not for the migrant influx, while white wages would have remained unchanged. On net, migration was an avenue for black economic advancement, but the migration created both winners and losers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-782
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Economic History
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Competition in the promised land: Black migration and racial wage convergence in the North, 1940-1970'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this