Classical and fluctuation-induced electromagnetic interactions in micron-scale systems: Designer bonding, antibonding, and Casimir forces

Alejandro W. Alejandro, Pui Chuen Hui, David P. Woolf, Steven G. Johnson, Marko Lončar, Federico Capasso

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Whether intentionally introduced to exert control over particles and macroscopic objects, such as for trapping or cooling, or whether arising from the quantum and thermal fluctuations of charges in otherwise neutral bodies, leading to unwanted stiction between nearby mechanical parts, electromagnetic interactions play a fundamental role in many naturally occurring processes and technologies. In this review, we survey recent progress in the understanding and experimental observation of optomechanical and quantum-fluctuation forces. Although both of these effects arise from exchange of electromagnetic momentum, their dramatically different origins, involving either real or virtual photons, lead to different physical manifestations and design principles. Specifically, we describe recent predictions and measurements of attractive and repulsive optomechanical forces, based on the bonding and antibonding interactions of evanescent waves, as well as predictions of modified and even repulsive Casimir forces between nanostructured bodies. Finally, we discuss the potential impact and interplay of these forces in emerging experimental regimes of micromechanical devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-80
Number of pages36
JournalAnnalen der Physik
Volume527
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Keywords

  • Antibonding
  • Bonding
  • Casimir effect
  • Fluctuations
  • Gradient forces
  • MEMS
  • Optical forces
  • Optomechanics
  • Photothermal forces

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