Cellular resolution optical access to brain regions in fissures: Imaging medial prefrontal cortex and grid cells in entorhinal cortex

Ryan J. Low, Yi Gu, David W. Tank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

In vivo two-photon microscopy provides the foundation for an array of powerful techniques for optically measuring and perturbing neural circuits. However, challenging tissue properties and geometry have prevented high-resolution optical access to regions situated within deep fissures. These regions include the medial prefrontal and medial entorhinal cortex (mPFC and MEC), which are of broad scientific and clinical interest. Here, we present a method for in vivo, subcellular resolution optical access to the mPFC and MEC using microprisms inserted into the fissures. We chronically imaged the mPFC and MEC in mice running on a spherical treadmill, using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy and genetically encoded calcium indicators to measure network activity. In the MEC, we imaged grid cells, a widely studied cell type essential to memory and spatial information processing. These cells exhibited spatially modulated activity during navigation in a virtual reality environment. This method should be extendable to other brain regions situated within deep fissures, and opens up these regions for study at cellular resolution in behaving animals using a rapidly expanding palette of optical tools for perturbing and measuring network structure and function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18739-18744
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number52
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 30 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Keywords

  • Grid cell
  • Medial entorhinal cortex
  • Medial prefrontal cortex
  • Two-photon imaging

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