Biomass-fired steam-injected gas turbine cogeneration

E. D. Larson, R. H. Williams

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Steam injection for power and efficiency augmentation in aeroderivative gas turbines is one important innovation that has become commercially established for natural gas-fired cogeneration since 1980. Steam-injected gas turbines fired with coal and biomass are now being developed. The technology, performance, and cost of three steam-injected gas turbine cogeneration systems fired with biomass are assessed here. Compared to directly- and indirectly-fired systems, the biomass-gasifier steam-injected gas turbine (GSTIG) is the most promising in terms of efficiency, capital cost, and commercial viability. A detailed economic case study of GSTIG cogeneration is presented for a Jamaican cane sugar factory, using sugar cane residues as fuel. GSTIG cogeneration units would be attractive investments for sugar producers, who could sell large quantities of excess electricity to the utility, or for the utility, as a low-cost generating option. Worldwide, there are large potential GSTIG markets. The sugar industry alone could support some 50,000 MW of capacity. The R&D effort required to commercialize the GSTIG would be modest compared to the potential benefits to users and gas turbine manufacturers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages57-66
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Dec 1 1988
Event1988 ASME COGEN-TURBO: 2nd International Symposium on Turbomachinery, Combined-Cycle Technologies and Cogeneration - Montreux, Switz
Duration: Aug 30 1988Sep 1 1988

Conference

Conference1988 ASME COGEN-TURBO: 2nd International Symposium on Turbomachinery, Combined-Cycle Technologies and Cogeneration
CityMontreux, Switz
Period8/30/889/1/88

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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