Attributing awareness to oneself and to others

Yin T. Kelly, Taylor W. Webb, Jeffrey D. Meier, Michael J. Arcaro, Michael S.A. Graziano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the possible relationship between reported visual awareness ("I see a visual stimulus in front of me") and the social attribution of awareness to someone else ("That person is aware of an object next to him"). Subjects were tested in two steps. First, in an fMRI experiment, subjects were asked to attribute states of awareness to a cartoon face. Activity associated with this task was found bilaterally within the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) among other areas. Second, the TPJ was transiently disrupted using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). When the TMS was targeted to the same cortical sites that had become active during the social attribution task, the subjects showed symptoms of visual neglect in that their detection of visual stimuli was significantly affected. In control trials, when TMS was targeted to nearby cortical sites that had not become active during the social attribution task, no significant effect on visual detection was found. These results suggest that there may be at least some partial overlap in brain mechanisms that participate in the social attribution of sensory awareness to other people and in attributing sensory awareness to oneself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5012-5017
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Consciousness
  • Social cognition

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