Arene Insertion with Pincer-Supported Molybdenum-Hydrides: Determination of Site Selectivity, Relative Rates, and Arene Complex Formation

Gabriele Hierlmeier, Paolo Tosatti, Kurt Puentener, Paul J. Chirik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The synthesis of phosphino(oxazoline)pyridine-supported molybdenum(0) cycloocta-1,5-diene complexes is described. Exposure of these complexes to dihydrogen in the presence of an arene resulted in insertion of the substrate into the molybdenum hydride bond and afforded the corresponding molybdenum cyclohexadienyl hydrides. For mono- and disubstituted arenes, the site selectivity for insertion of the most substituted bond increases with increasing size of the substituent from methyl to ethyl, iso-propyl, and tert-butyl. In contrast, 1,3,5-trisubstituted arenes underwent insertion with exclusive site selectivity. Relative rates of insertion were determined by competition experiments and established faster insertions for electron-rich arenes. Introduction of electron-withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the arene resulted in decreased relative rates of insertion and an increased rate for H2 reductive elimination, favoring formation of the corresponding molybdenum η6-arene complex. Studies on the reductive elimination of the cyclohexadienyl ligand with the hydride enabled the synthesis of an enantioenriched cyclohexa-1,3-diene. This study provides new insights into the ligand requirements for catalytic arene hydrogenation and a new strategy for selective arene reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21027-21039
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume145
Issue number38
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • General Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

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