Are Millennials Really Particularly Selfish? Preliminary Evidence From a Cross-Sectional Sample in the Philanthropy Panel Study

Peter Koczanski, Harvey S. Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We use panel data on charitable donations to analyze how the philanthropic behavior of Millennials (born between 1981 and 1996) compares with that of earlier generations. On the basis of a multivariate analysis with a rich set of economic and demographic variables, we find that conditional on making a gift, one cannot reject the hypothesis that Millennials donate more than members of earlier generations. However, Millennials are somewhat less likely to make any donations at all than their generational predecessors. While our data do not allow us to explore causal mechanisms, our findings suggest a more nuanced view of the Millennials’ prosocial behavior than is depicted in popular accounts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1965-1982
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Behavioral Scientist
Volume63
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Keywords

  • Millennials
  • charity
  • emerging adulthood theory
  • generosity
  • selfishness

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