Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict, and inequality across 38 nations

Federica Durante, Susan T. Fiske, Michele J. Gelfand, Franca Crippa, Chiara Suttora, Amelia Stillwell, Frank Asbrock, Zeynep Aycan, Hege H. Bye, Rickard Carlsson, Fredrik Björklund, Munqith Dagher, Armando Geller, Christian Albrekt Larsen, Abdel Hamid Abdel Latif, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Inga Jasinskaja-Lahti, Ali Teymoori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations (n = 4,344), investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent warmth and competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan) may need clearcut, unambivalent group images distinguishing friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with intermediate conflict (United States) may need ambivalence to justify more complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries display lower stereotype ambivalence, whereas countries intermediate on peace-conflict present higher ambivalence. These data also replicated a linear inequality-ambivalence relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-674
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume114
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 24 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Keywords

  • Ambivalence
  • Conflict
  • Inequality
  • Peace
  • Stereotypes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict, and inequality across 38 nations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this