Ambivalence and Stereotypes Cause Sexual Harassment: A Theory with Implications for Organizational Change

Susan Tufts Fiske, Peter Glick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

We theorize that sexual harassment in the workplace results from the complex interplay of ambivalent motives and gender stereotyping of women and jobs. Ambivalence combines hostile and “benevolent” sexist motives based on paternalism, gender differentiation, and heterosexuality. Stereotyped images of women and jobs also reflect these three dimensions. Together, these ambivalent motives and stereotyped cognitions promote sexual harassment of different types. Organizational context can encourage or discourage the cognitive‐motivational dimensions that underlie sexual harassment. 1995 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-115
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social Issues
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

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