Affective regulation of implicitly measured stereotypes and attitudes: Automatic and controlled processes

Jeffrey R. Huntsinger, Stacey Sinclair, Gerald L. Clore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three experiments indicate that affective cues regulate expression of implicitly measured stereotypes and attitudes. In Experiment 1, negative mood led to less stereotypic bias on the weapon-identification task [Payne, B. K. (2001). Prejudice and perception: The role of automatic and controlled processes in misperceiving a weapon. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 181-192] than positive mood. In Experiment 2, negative mood led to less implicitly measured racial prejudice than positive mood. In Experiment 3, negative, relative to positive, mood decreased women's implicitly measured preference for the arts over math. Process-dissociation analyses suggested that affect regulated automatic attitude and stereotype activation rather than controlled influences on attitude expression. The results show that mood can shape even rudimentary forms of cognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-566
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Automaticity
  • Implicit attitudes
  • Mood

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