Acute Disorders of Consciousness in Pediatric Severe Sepsis and Organ Failure: Secondary Analysis of the Multicenter Phenotyping Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Failure Study*

Christina Cheung, Kate F. Kernan, Robert A. Berg, Athena F. Zuppa, Daniel A. Notterman, Murray M. Pollack, David Wessel, Kathleen L. Meert, Mark W. Hall, Christopher Newth, John C. Lin, Allan Doctor, Tom Shanley, Tim Cornell, Rick E. Harrison, Russell K. Banks, Ron W. Reeder, Richard Holubkov, Joseph A. Carcillo, Ericka L. Fink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Acute disorders of consciousness (DoC) in pediatric severe sepsis are associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. We sought to examine the frequency of and factors associated with DoC in children with sepsis-induced organ failure. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of the multicenter Phenotyping Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Failure Study (PHENOMS). SETTING: Nine tertiary care PICUs in the United States. PATIENTS: Children less than 18 years old admitted to a PICU with severe sepsis and at least one organ failure during a PICU stay. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary outcome was frequency of DoC, defined as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) less than 12 in the absence of sedatives during an ICU stay, among children with severe sepsis and the following: single organ failure, nonphenotypeable multiple organ failure (MOF), MOF with one of the PHENOMS phenotypes (immunoparalysis-associated MOF [IPMOF], sequential liver failure-associated MOF, thrombocytopenia-associated MOF), or MOF with multiple phenotypes. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between clinical variables and organ failure groups with DoC. Of 401 children studied, 71 (18%) presented with DoC. Children presenting with DoC were older (median 8 vs 5 yr; p = 0.023), had increased hospital mortality (21% vs 10%; p = 0.011), and more frequently presented with both any MOF (93% vs 71%; p < 0.001) and macrophage activation syndrome (14% vs 4%; p = 0.004). Among children with any MOF, those presenting with DoC most frequently had nonphenotypeable MOF and IPMOF (52% and 34%, respectively). In the multivariable analysis, older age (odds ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12) and any MOF (3.22 [1.19-8.70]) were associated with DoC. CONCLUSIONS: One of every five children with severe sepsis and organ failure experienced acute DoC during their PICU stay. Preliminary findings suggest the need for prospective evaluation of DoC in children with sepsis and MOF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)840-848
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Keywords

  • multiple organ dysfunction
  • neurological manifestations
  • pediatrics
  • sepsis

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