A Rhythmic Theory of Attention

Ian C. Fiebelkorn, Sabine Kastner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent evidence has demonstrated that environmental sampling is a fundamentally rhythmic process. Both perceptual sensitivity during covert spatial attention and the probability of overt exploratory movements are tethered to theta-band activity (3–8 Hz) in the attention network. The fronto-parietal part of this network is positioned at the nexus of sensory and motor functions, directing two tightly coupled processes related to environmental exploration: preferential routing of sensory input and saccadic eye movements. We propose that intrinsic theta rhythms temporally resolve potential functional conflicts by periodically reweighting functional connections between higher-order brain regions and either sensory or motor regions. This rhythmic reweighting alternately promotes either sampling at a behaviorally relevant location (i.e., sensory functions) or shifting to another location (i.e., motor functions).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-101
Number of pages15
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Theta Rhythm
Saccades
Brain
Nexus
Conflict (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Fiebelkorn, Ian C. ; Kastner, Sabine. / A Rhythmic Theory of Attention. In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 87-101.
@article{c5981b6d28bb44d1bb45930b39691c79,
title = "A Rhythmic Theory of Attention",
abstract = "Recent evidence has demonstrated that environmental sampling is a fundamentally rhythmic process. Both perceptual sensitivity during covert spatial attention and the probability of overt exploratory movements are tethered to theta-band activity (3–8 Hz) in the attention network. The fronto-parietal part of this network is positioned at the nexus of sensory and motor functions, directing two tightly coupled processes related to environmental exploration: preferential routing of sensory input and saccadic eye movements. We propose that intrinsic theta rhythms temporally resolve potential functional conflicts by periodically reweighting functional connections between higher-order brain regions and either sensory or motor regions. This rhythmic reweighting alternately promotes either sampling at a behaviorally relevant location (i.e., sensory functions) or shifting to another location (i.e., motor functions).",
author = "Fiebelkorn, {Ian C.} and Sabine Kastner",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.tics.2018.11.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "87--101",
journal = "Trends in Cognitive Sciences",
issn = "1364-6613",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

A Rhythmic Theory of Attention. / Fiebelkorn, Ian C.; Kastner, Sabine.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 87-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Rhythmic Theory of Attention

AU - Fiebelkorn, Ian C.

AU - Kastner, Sabine

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Recent evidence has demonstrated that environmental sampling is a fundamentally rhythmic process. Both perceptual sensitivity during covert spatial attention and the probability of overt exploratory movements are tethered to theta-band activity (3–8 Hz) in the attention network. The fronto-parietal part of this network is positioned at the nexus of sensory and motor functions, directing two tightly coupled processes related to environmental exploration: preferential routing of sensory input and saccadic eye movements. We propose that intrinsic theta rhythms temporally resolve potential functional conflicts by periodically reweighting functional connections between higher-order brain regions and either sensory or motor regions. This rhythmic reweighting alternately promotes either sampling at a behaviorally relevant location (i.e., sensory functions) or shifting to another location (i.e., motor functions).

AB - Recent evidence has demonstrated that environmental sampling is a fundamentally rhythmic process. Both perceptual sensitivity during covert spatial attention and the probability of overt exploratory movements are tethered to theta-band activity (3–8 Hz) in the attention network. The fronto-parietal part of this network is positioned at the nexus of sensory and motor functions, directing two tightly coupled processes related to environmental exploration: preferential routing of sensory input and saccadic eye movements. We propose that intrinsic theta rhythms temporally resolve potential functional conflicts by periodically reweighting functional connections between higher-order brain regions and either sensory or motor regions. This rhythmic reweighting alternately promotes either sampling at a behaviorally relevant location (i.e., sensory functions) or shifting to another location (i.e., motor functions).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058957682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058957682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tics.2018.11.009

DO - 10.1016/j.tics.2018.11.009

M3 - Review article

VL - 23

SP - 87

EP - 101

JO - Trends in Cognitive Sciences

JF - Trends in Cognitive Sciences

SN - 1364-6613

IS - 2

ER -