A recombinant plasmid from which an infectious adeno-associated virus genome can be excised in vitro and its use to study viral replication

R. J. Samulski, L. S. Chang, T. Shenk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

329 Scopus citations

Abstract

A recombinant plasmid carrying an infectious adeno-associated viral genome was constructed that differs in several key respects from previously described recombinants. First, the vector is pEMBL8(+), which allows isolation of viral plus and minus strands. Second, the inserted viral sequences contain two XbaI cleavage sites that flank the viral coding domain. These inserts do not affect replication of the virus, and they allow nonviral sequences to be easily inserted between the cis-acting terminal repeats of adeno-associated virus. Third, the viral genome is flanked by PvuII cleavage sites that allow the entire, infectious viral chromosome to be excised from plasmid sequences in vitro. Viral DNA was replicated more efficiently within adenovirus-infected 293 cells if it was excised from the vector with PvuII before transfection. Presumably, the increased efficiency reflects bypass of the excision step which must normally precede replication when a recombinant plasmid enters the nucleus. The ability to bypass the excision step was exploited to search for a viral function required specifically for excision of the viral genome from the integrated state. None of the mutants tested identified a gene product required for excision that was not also essential for replication. The ability to produce pure populations of viral plus and minus strands was used to demonstrate that both strands are infectious.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3096-3101
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of virology
Volume61
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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