A herpesvirus vector for expression of glycosylated membrane antigens: Fusion proteins of pseudorabies virus gIII and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins

M. E. Whealy, K. Baumeister, A. K. Robbins, L. W. Enquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We describe experiments using the swine herpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV), as a vector for expression of hybrid membrane protein genes. In particular, we present the construction and analysis of three infectious PRV mutants expressing chimeric viral membrane proteins composed of portions of the PRV envelope glycoprotein gIII and of the human retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. All of the chimeric genes contain the transcription control sequences and the first 157 codons of PRV gIII (known to contain signals sufficient for efficient export of the encoded peptide out of the cell) fused to different regions of the HIV-1 envelope. The mutant viruses express novel glycosylated fusion proteins that are immunoprecipitated by polyvalent sera specific for gIII, as well as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient sera. The levels of expression are lower than expected due primarily to instability or altered processing of the hybrid mRNA. We could not detect cleavage of chimeric proteins carrying the gp120-gp41 protease processing site. The use of localization signals contained within herpesvirus membrane proteins to direct chimeric proteins to desired cellular locations is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4185-4194
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of virology
Volume62
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A herpesvirus vector for expression of glycosylated membrane antigens: Fusion proteins of pseudorabies virus gIII and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this