A computational model of anterior cingulate function in speeded response tasks: Effects of frequency, sequence, and conflict

Andrew D. Jones, Raymond Y. Cho, Leigh E. Nystrom, Jonathan D. Cohen, Todd S. Braver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

A growing body of evidence from functional neuroimaging and computational modeling studies indicates that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) detects the presence of response conflict and conveys this information to other brain regions, enabling subsequent adjustments in cognitive control. The present study examined previous empirical findings of increased ACC for low-frequency stimuli across three distinct speeded response tasks (two-alternative forced choice, go/no-go, and oddball). Simulations conducted in a neural network model incorporating sequential priming mechanisms (developed in Cho et al., 2002) confirmed that a computational measure of response conflict was higher on low-frequency trials across all three tasks. In addition, the model captured detailed aspects of behavioral reaction time and accuracy data, predicted the dynamics of ACC activity related to trial sequence effects, and provided evidence for the functional role of conflict information in performance monitoring and optimization. The results indicate that the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, augmented by mechanisms for encoding stimulus history, can explain key phenomena associated with performance in sequential speeded response tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-317
Number of pages18
JournalCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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